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SpeedingFirebird
10-01-2009, 09:14 PM
OK, This is probably really stupid, but I am grasping at straws so I do not have to pull the oil pan. I need to connect an oil drain fitting the the oil pan. One idea is to weld a nut on the outside of the pan for the fitting.

Would J-B weld be strong enough to hold a nut on to the side of the oil pan?

tmon930
10-01-2009, 09:21 PM
lol reminds me of a friend who has a third gen. had his oil pan held together with jb weld hahaha

i would not recommend it. even though he got away with it.

TheGr8Schlotzky
10-02-2009, 01:45 AM
I've repaired an oil pan with JB Weld before. The stuff really is amazing, it's like metal when it's dry.

Although it is a bit of a redneck fix, with the right surface prep, I think it would work just dandy. My engine teacher was telling me about entire corners of heads that got chunked off and were repaired with JB weld with no problems. I think he had something like 20 years in professional engine building, and 15 years as an ASE technician teacher.

Need For Steve
10-02-2009, 03:55 AM
yea, JB pretty much is the bomb. i've heard of heads with gouged plane surfaces being repaired with JB weld, smoothed out and holding pressure perfect.

SpeedingFirebird
10-02-2009, 08:52 AM
I've repaired an oil pan with JB Weld before. The stuff really is amazing, it's like metal when it's dry.

Although it is a bit of a redneck fix, with the right surface prep, I think it would work just dandy. My engine teacher was telling me about entire corners of heads that got chunked off and were repaired with JB weld with no problems. I think he had something like 20 years in professional engine building, and 15 years as an ASE technician teacher.

My engine builder had to do that with my heads. He used some Epoxy to repair it.

freakv6
10-02-2009, 09:00 AM
I think it could work, i would just use it as the last option. Can you not just drill and tap it?

1LOMARO
10-02-2009, 09:05 AM
Using JB on an oil pan is not a recommendation that I would make..been there..tried that when I punctured a hole in one....

bubba428
10-02-2009, 10:36 AM
LOL my radiator drain cock is JB, a rubber gaskit, washer and a bolt holds fine

Bonemaro
10-02-2009, 10:51 AM
I've got a camera crane that's held together with JB Weld. Lots on weight and movement on it. Been holding up.

SpeedingFirebird
10-02-2009, 03:00 PM
I think it could work, i would just use it as the last option. Can you not just drill and tap it?

I could, but there is not much metal to tap. I am concerned it could come off while racing.

Bonemaro
10-02-2009, 03:37 PM
I think welding a nut on the pan would be more fun.

tmon930
10-02-2009, 04:15 PM
to be honest, if you're racing with the car, i wouldn't half ass it. pull the pan and do it right.

SpeedingFirebird
10-02-2009, 04:47 PM
to be honest, if you're racing with the car, i wouldn't half ass it. pull the pan and do it right.

<whine> but pulling the pan is a pain in the ass! </whine>

I know someone that travels with his welding equipment. I could see if he could weld a nut while on the car. Could be pretty expensive though.

Bonemaro
10-02-2009, 04:51 PM
<whine> but pulling the pan is a pain in the ass! </whine>

I know someone that travels with his welding equipment. I could see if he could weld a nut while on the car. Could be pretty expensive though.

http://static.zoovy.com/img/spittys/-/1/firesite2

SpeedingFirebird
10-02-2009, 10:36 PM
http://static.zoovy.com/img/spittys/-/1/firesite2

details Bone, details

bob8703
10-02-2009, 11:27 PM
oil is flammable lol. that and if you drill a hole you dont want metal shavings in your oil pan

SpeedingFirebird
10-03-2009, 07:23 AM
oil is flammable lol. that and if you drill a hole you dont want metal shavings in your oil pan

the suggestion for tapping is to slather the bit with Vaseline and immediately change the oil.

TheGr8Schlotzky
10-06-2009, 01:22 PM
You could drill and tap it, and then run a bead of JB Weld around the outer perimeter. That would get you the best of both worlds, and would probably be plenty strong. I wouldn't think just about anything would pop that off that wouldn't pop off a factory drain plug.

SpeedingFirebird
10-06-2009, 04:28 PM
You could drill and tap it, and then run a bead of JB Weld around the outer perimeter. That would get you the best of both worlds, and would probably be plenty strong. I wouldn't think just about anything would pop that off that wouldn't pop off a factory drain plug.

I thought about that. The drawback is that in does not come out if need be. The again, if it has to come out, I'm probably talking about a new oil pan anyway.

1LOMARO
10-06-2009, 05:09 PM
Jay... I hate to be the prick here..but it sounds like you are thinking about half assing this... you have taken time and consideration with the rest of the car.... why half ass it now???

freakv6
10-06-2009, 05:16 PM
also dont they make adapters that t off of the oil sending unit or even the original drain plug. i know some people have used these.

SpeedingFirebird
10-06-2009, 09:18 PM
Jay... I hate to be the prick here..


It's cool.



but it sounds like you are thinking about half assing this... you have taken time and consideration with the rest of the car.... why half ass it now???


time bro. Just looking for reasonable alternatives to yanking the pan. I am having trouble finding the time to get this project done. I know, I know, winter is coming, and I'll have tons of time. After three months, it is aggravating the piss out of me. After hooking in the IC, I realized we screwed the pooch on the IC inlet pipe, and it has to be redone.


also dont they make adapters that t off of the oil sending unit or even the original drain plug. i know some people have used these.

I have read that some people replace the level sensor for the turbo return line, but I cannot clear the oil level code after that. The sending unit is T'ed for the oil feed line. The drain plug is too low for the return. Keep the ideas coming though!

SpeedingFirebird
10-06-2009, 09:38 PM
Another thought. Anyone try "self clinching nuts"?

Clinching Nuts are designed to be installed in thin metal applications when the material is too thin for tapping threads. Clinching Nuts can provide threads and excellent performance without concern about torque-out or pull-out.

http://www.fastenal.com/web/products/detail.ex?sku=0127416&ucst=t

Edit - looks like I need access to the inside of the pan for that to work. There is something called a "blind press nut", but I cannot find any details.

tmon930
10-07-2009, 03:33 PM
pull the pan.

Bonemaro
10-07-2009, 03:44 PM
"blind press nut"

Sounds painful.

SpeedingFirebird
10-08-2009, 03:31 PM
Stupid question #2. Does the oil have to drain into the pain. Can it drain into the top end of the motor, or will that create too much back pressure in the oil line?

freakv6
10-08-2009, 03:38 PM
ive never seen a setup with it draining into the vc, so i would imagine not. I would think that could cause a pressurization issue.

SpeedingFirebird
10-09-2009, 09:37 PM
ive never seen a setup with it draining into the vc, so i would imagine not. I would think that could cause a pressurization issue.

that's what I figured. If it worked, everyone would do it. :)